Monday, 24 July 2017

Principles of communication

Principles of communication Communication is the foundation of an effective doctor-patient relationship. It works both ways i.e. it has advantages for both the patient as well as the doctor. Good communication is the key to building trust, patient compliance to the prescribed treatment, patient satisfaction including better clinical outcomes. A good communicator is also a great motivator. Poor communication has been attributed as a major contributor to litigations against doctors. Hence, good communication skills are therefore very important for the doctor. There are certain principles of communication that should be followed for effective outcomes. • Know your target audience. Your audience is made up of diverse group of people, with different cultural backgrounds and health literacy levels. Assess their level of awareness of your audience and tailor your message accordingly. If the level of awareness is low, talk to them at their level and gradually build up the level of your message. Do this even if this is the case with even one member of the audience so that all get the benefit of your message and nobody feels left out. Remember, “One size fits all” messages don’t work always. • Decide your agenda. You must know what message you want to give. The health information should be field tested and should not create any panic or fear in the society. Communication should be concise and focused. • Use multiple channels of communication. Decide how you want to deliver the message. There are several channels of communication. Print – newspapers, posters, press releases etc. Audiovideo – radio/TV interviews, press conferences etc. or internet – email, social media, SMS. • Message should be evidence-based. Your message should be fact-based or evidence-based and not based on opinions or myths. Higher the level of evidence, lesser the chances of your message being contradicted or refuted. While giving a health statement, quote a credible source of information such as meta-analysis, randomized-controlled studies and reviews published in credible journals. • Strike while the iron is still hot. Timing is of great importance in effective communication for desired outcomes. • Follow the cycle of Teach, Reason, Summarize and Revise. Pre and post evaluation of the audience is important. Always revise at the end to find out what is understood. • Word of mouth communication. Involve “community leaders” or “celebrities” people who count in the community, who are considered reliable by the people, who people look up to as role models.

IMA adopts Aao School Chalen Project

IMA adopts Aao School Chalen Project • Emphasizes on the importance of imparting public health education in schools • Fifth day of every month to be designated to activities under this project New Delhi, 23 July 2017: According to statistics, about 60% of the country’s population is below the age of 45 including the sub-group of schoolchildren. The health and well-being of the country’s young people is not a matter of luck and neither is it a chance or random event. It must be a planned outcome. Considering this, the IMA has adopted the "Aao School Chalen Project" initiated by Delhi Medical Association in the recent past as a National Project. Under the project, the 5th day of every month has been designated for any activity related to this project. The IMA has always stressed on the importance of imparting public health education in schools and this is a step in that direction. As a part of the 'Aao School Chalen' project, lectures and awareness campaigns will be held in schools to sensitize school children on various public health issues. Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, "School health is very important as schools are not just centers that impart formal education, but also influence overall development of a child. To enjoy good health during adulthood, healthy lifestyle including hygiene habits must be inculcated in childhood itself. These habits learned during childhood last through to adulthood and then through life. Moreover, children are naturally inquisitive and keen learners. Thus, they are not only beneficiaries of any health-related activity but also agents of change in their family.” School health education programmes can help reduce health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, drug and alcohol use. It is imperative to impart quality public health education in schools and promote positive health behavior among children and adolescents alike. Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “Visit your old school if you can or any nearby school during the school assembly and interact with students and teachers to sensitize them on issues of public health importance. Speak to the principal of the school beforehand about this. It need not be a long-drawn talk, but a short talk of 10 to 15 minutes. Get a certificate (proforma) signed by the Principal. Send the proforma to IMA HQs along with the photographs taken with students during assembly for records.” The schedule of the lectures to be organized is as under. • 5 August - Vector-borne diseases • 5 September – Lifestyle • 5 October - Menstruation myths • 5 November - Health and hygiene • 5 December – Substance abuse IMA adopts Aao School Chalen Project • Emphasizes on the importance of imparting public health education in schools • Fifth day of every month to be designated to activities under this project New Delhi, 23 July 2017: According to statistics, about 60% of the country’s population is below the age of 45 including the sub-group of schoolchildren. The health and well-being of the country’s young people is not a matter of luck and neither is it a chance or random event. It must be a planned outcome. Considering this, the IMA has adopted the "Aao School Chalen Project" initiated by Delhi Medical Association in the recent past as a National Project. Under the project, the 5th day of every month has been designated for any activity related to this project. The IMA has always stressed on the importance of imparting public health education in schools and this is a step in that direction. As a part of the 'Aao School Chalen' project, lectures and awareness campaigns will be held in schools to sensitize school children on various public health issues. Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, "School health is very important as schools are not just centers that impart formal education, but also influence overall development of a child. To enjoy good health during adulthood, healthy lifestyle including hygiene habits must be inculcated in childhood itself. These habits learned during childhood last through to adulthood and then through life. Moreover, children are naturally inquisitive and keen learners. Thus, they are not only beneficiaries of any health-related activity but also agents of change in their family.” School health education programmes can help reduce health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, drug and alcohol use. It is imperative to impart quality public health education in schools and promote positive health behavior among children and adolescents alike. Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “Visit your old school if you can or any nearby school during the school assembly and interact with students and teachers to sensitize them on issues of public health importance. Speak to the principal of the school beforehand about this. It need not be a long-drawn talk, but a short talk of 10 to 15 minutes. Get a certificate (proforma) signed by the Principal. Send the proforma to IMA HQs along with the photographs taken with students during assembly for records.” The schedule of the lectures to be organized is as under. • 5 August - Vector-borne diseases • 5 September – Lifestyle • 5 October - Menstruation myths • 5 November - Health and hygiene • 5 December – Substance abuse

Sunday, 23 July 2017

“Time Churao” campaign: “Steal” time out of your busy schedule

“Time Churao” campaign: “Steal” time out of your busy schedule Almost everybody today complains of lack of time… “There is so much to do and too little time to do”. Everybody seems to be busier than ever. Well, being a doctor is not an easy job, it’s also a busy job. Being a doctor also means multifaceted responsibilities. A doctor not only has to treat his patients, he is also a teacher, researcher, manager, communicator, community leader. Health education is an important component of the duties and responsibilities of a doctor. It has a direct link to patient satisfaction. However, in a busy practice, doctors often lack the time to educate their patients and families about different health-related issues. Juggling both practice and home often leaves doctors with no time left for community health activities. Here is what I do. Whenever I am invited to a function and the chief guest is running late, I ask the organizers for the mike and start ‘zero hour’. Instead of sitting on the dais, I like to walk around the room, among the audience and interact with them. Being on the same level as the audience breaks a barrier and people may find it less intimidating to raise questions. During Zero hour in the Parliament, members can raise any important matter that is relevant to the public. These questions do not require any prior notice. Similarly, I ask them questions on any health-related topic – of current interest or any other - and try to engage them in discussion. I find that a lively Q &A session is a good way to disseminate information and educating the people as I also come to know their level of awareness about a topic. I avoid speaking too much of medical jargon or scientific terms because the audience soon loses interest. This is how I “steal” time out of my busy schedule to converse with the public. I encourage all of you to do such activity to educate your patients, their families and friends and the public. Dr KK Aggarwal National President IMA & HCFI Recipient of Padma Shri, Dr BC Roy National Award, Vishwa Hindi Samman, National Science Communication Award & FICCI Health Care Personality of the Year Award Vice President Confederation of Medical Associations of Asia and Oceania (CMAAO) Past Honorary Secretary General IMA Past Senior National Vice President IMA President Heart Care Foundation of India Gold Medalist Nagpur University Limca Book of Record Holder in CPR 10 Honorary Professor of Bioethics SRM Medical College Hospital & Research Centre Sr. Consultant Medicine & Cardiology, Dean Board of Medical Education, Moolchand Editor in Chief IJCP Group of Publications & eMedinewS Member Ethics Committee Medical Council of India (2013-14) Chairman Ethics Committee Delhi Medical Council (2009-15) Elected Member Delhi Medical Council (2004-2009) Chairman IMSA Delhi Chapter (March 10- March 13) Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08-09) Finance Secretary IMA (07-08) Chairman IMAAMS (06-07) President Delhi Medical Association (05-06)

IMA delegation visits and congratulates the newly elected President of India

IMA delegation visits and congratulates the newly elected President of India The Association is hopeful of some positive changes in the healthcare scenario in the country under the President’s leadership New Delhi, 22 July 2017: An IMA delegation led by its National President, DR K K Aggarwal, visited the newly elected 14th President of India, Shri Ram Nath Kovind. The visit was aimed towards not only congratulating the President but also to take a step ahead in working together for the betterment of the medical profession. IMA has since long been actively fighting to restore the nobility and dignity of the medical profession and recently concluded the Dilli Chalo movement to voice the concerns of the fraternity at large. Both India’s healthcare sector and the medical fraternity have many challenges to address. Not only is there a dearth of adequate doctors but the existing ones also face issues such as violence at the hands of the public. All this requires urgent consideration and by meeting the President, the IMA hoped to make a head start to address them. Speaking about this, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI), Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA and Dr Narender Saini, Former Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said, “At the outset, we would like to congratulate Shri Ram Nath Kovind for assuming office as the 14th President of India. It is indeed an honor to have a leader like him working for the welfare of the nation. Healthcare delivery in India is undergoing many changes be it in terms of prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. All entities in the healthcare sector need to work in tandem with each other to resolve the issues that our profession is facing today. The medical profession is facing one of the toughest times today. Repeated pleas and appeals by the medical fraternity have not materialized into anything except reassurances. It is in these areas that we seek the Hon’ble President’s cooperation and support.” The last few months have seen several other initiatives by the IMA on this front such as STOP NMC Sathyagraha, two National Protest Days against violence on doctors, NO to NEXT strike in medical colleges, and the National Black Day against West Bengal Clinical Establishments Act. Other than this, 3 action committee meetings and 2 meetings of FOMA were also conducted. Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, “For any movement to be successful, the leadership should fall in the right hands. And we believe that with Shri Kovind as the President, IMA’s efforts will be adequately supported. The need of the hour is collective action and decision which would do justice to this profession.” The IMA is working towards resolving the following issues. • Criminal prosecution of medical negligence and clerical errors • Stringent central act against violence on doctors • Capping the compensation in CPA on doctors • Professional autonomy in treatment and prescriptions • Amendments in PC PNDT, Central CEA, West Bengal CEA Acts • No unscientific mixing of systems of medicine • Empower MBBS graduates • One drug - One company - One price • Implement inter-ministerial committee recommendations in six weeks • Single window accountability • Single window registration of doctors and medical establishments • No to NMC: Amend IMC act to maintain professional autonomy • Uniform final MBBS exam instead of ‘NEXT’ • Uniform service conditions for service doctors & faculty • Same work - Same pay - Pay parity - No to adhocism • Fair conduction of NEET exam • IMA member in every government health committee • Central anti-quackery law • Reimbursement of emergency services provided by private sector • 25000 family medicine PG seats • Aided hospitals and retainer ship in general practice • Health budget of 5 % of GDP for universal health coverage

Saturday, 22 July 2017

Aao School Chalen: A national project undertaken by IMA

Aao School Chalen: A national project undertaken by IMA School health is very important as schools are not just centers that impart formal education, they also influence overall development of a child. To enjoy good health during adulthood, healthy lifestyle including hygiene habits must be inculcated during childhood. These habits learned during childhood last through to adulthood and all their lives. Moreover, children are naturally inquisitive and keen learners. So, they are both beneficiaries of any health-related activity and agents of change in their family. To this end, the Indian Medical Association (IMA) has adopted “Aao School Chalen Project” initiated by Delhi Medical Association in the recent past as a National Project. The 5th of every month has been designated for any activity related to this project. Visit your old school if you can or any nearby school during the school assembly and interact with students and teachers to sensitize them on issues of public health importance. Speak to the principal of the school beforehand about this. It need not be long-drawn talk, but should be a short talk of 10-15 min duration. Get a certificate (proforma) signed by the Principal. Send the proforma to IMA HQs along with the photographs taken with students during assembly for records. We have identified few topics for the coming months and there will be common points for discussion for uniformity. The first topic for 5th August is “vector-borne diseases”. The 10 uniform messages for first lecture are as follows: 1. Mosquito-borne diseases are preventable and manageable if detected early. 2. Do not allow water to stagnate in or around the houses, particularly in plastic containers. 3. Wear full sleeves clothes during monsoon season. 4. All patients suffering from dengue, malaria, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis should use bed nets while sleeping. 5. Treatment of malaria should be started early; it can be for 3 days or 14 days depending on the type of malaria. 6. All patients with dengue do not require platelet transfusion. 7. IMA Slogans: “Katwaieyga to nahi” (I hope you will not get me bitten by a mosquito) or “My premises are mosquito-free, you are invited at my premises”. 8. Look for mosquitoes: inside or outside the house; both small and big containers, during day or night; in the room or on the roof; floor or up on the walls; larvae or the mosquito. 9. Let all schools be declared by the principal as being mosquito-free. 10. Let every child speak a slogan: “From now onwards my house will be mosquito free”. The schedule of the talks is as under: • 5th September: Lifestyle • 5th October: Menstruation myths • 5th November: Health and Hygiene • 5th December: Substance Abuse States and Local Branches of IMA are requested to circulate this information to all the members. Since, this is a national health project, IMA requests all its members to participate to make it a success. Dr KK Aggarwal National President IMA & HCFI

Proper diabetes care essential to keep diabetic foot at bay

Proper diabetes care essential to keep diabetic foot at bay Even a small injury can lead to complications and it is imperative to get feet checked annually in those with diabetes New Delhi, 21st July 2017: According to statistics, during the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, at least 1 in 10 people, possess risk factors for foot damage. Studies also estimate the prevalence of diabetic foot in India between 7.4% and 15.3%. It is important to identify this condition at the earliest and provide treatment failing which the condition can lead to serious health issues. A small injury can later develop infections and even end up in amputations. The WHO defines diabetic foot as, "The foot of a diabetes patient that has potential risk of pathologic consequences including infection, ulceration and /or destruction of deep tissues associated with neurologic abnormalities, various degrees of peripheral vascular disease and/or metabolic complications of diabetes in the lower limb." Speaking about this condition, Padma Shri Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, National President Indian Medical Association (IMA) and President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) and Dr RN Tandon – Honorary Secretary General IMA in a joint statement, said "It is imperative to check the feet every day once diabetes has been diagnosed. Factors such as callus, corn, infections of skin or nailbed, onychocryptosis or ingrown toe-nail can lead to ulcers and must be prevented. Diabetes leads to damage of nerves in the feet. In the absence of pain, such small injuries can go unnoticed. Additionally, other associated conditions such as high blood pressure, smoking, cholesterol, and obesity tend to reduce the blood flow to the feet, in a person with diabetes. All these predispose a person to secondary infections thereby aggravating the problem further. Some other complications associated with diabetic foot include ulceration, infection, septicaemia, gangrene, deformity, and limb loss." Some probable causes of a diabetic foot include peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage), vasculopathy, (obstruction of blood vessels), foot deformity, infection, and oedema (swollen feet). Treating a diabetic foot includes addressing three basic issues: debridement, offloading, and infection control. Adding further, Dr Aggarwal, said, "Those with diabetes should get their feet examined on an annual basis. It is important to notify the doctor if there are any cuts or breaks in the skin, or an ingrown nail, or if the feet become less sensitive or start hurting. It is possible to prevent development of diabetic foot by optimizing glycaemic control, offering patient education including daily feet examination, nail care, proper foot wear, and utilizing emollients to moisturize the feet." Follow these tips to take care of your feet if you have been diagnosed with diabetes: • Keep sugar levels under check: Follow lifestyle tips suggested by your doctor to keep your blood glucose levels in the correct range. • Check your feet every day: Watch out for any red spots, cuts, swelling, or blisters. • Be physically active: Engage in at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. • Keep your feet clean: Wash your feet every day and dry them carefully, especially the area between toes. • Moisturize feet well: Apply a thin coat of moisturizer over the top and bottom of your feet every day after you wash them. • Trim your nails regularly. • Wear comfortable shoes and socks: It is a good idea to not walk barefoot. Buy footwear that is comfortable and fit well. Ensure that the lining is smooth and there are no objects inside your footwear. • Keep the blood flowing to your feet: Put your feet up when sitting. Wiggle your toes and move your ankles up and down for 5 minutes, two (2) or three (3) times a day. Don't cross your legs for long periods of time.

Friday, 21 July 2017

What is team work?

What is team work? What is team work? When asked this question, the usual answer would be “a group of people with the ability to work effectively in a group with the objective of achieving a common goal”. Each member has a role to play within the team. How well a team works together can spell success and failure of a project. Several success stories have been credited to “team effort” and rightly so. Trust, mutual respect, commitment, communication, taking responsibility, cooperation are some of the skills that are usually listed as required as team work skills to achieve desired results. These are qualities that employers often seek in prospective employees. A team comprises a group of people, each with their own personality. And it is the personality of each team member more than the individual expertise or ability that each has to offer, which determines how well a team works together and delivers desired results in time. Each one of us has a physical profile (defined by our height, complexion, collar number, waist size, etc.), intellectual profile and ego profile (my bank balance, car, job designation, locality of residence, size of house, contacts, power, clothes, etc.). Then there is the “soul profile”. This is most important. Soul profile defines your uniqueness, your strengths. Your occupation or your position in the society or physical profile do not define you. It is your soul profile, which defines you, who you are as a person. According to Dr Deepak Chopra, to know your soul profile, ask yourself the following seven questions while sitting in a meditative poise or in state of relaxation. The answer to each question should be either in three words or three phrases. 1. What is my purpose of life? 2. What is my contribution going to be for my friends and family? 3. Three instances in my life when I had my peak experiences. 4. Names of three people who inspire me the most. 5. Three qualities which I admire in others the most. 6. Three of my unique talents. 7. Three qualities I best express in my relationship The 21 answers to these seven questions characterize your soul profile and define every action you perform in your life. A team therefore should be a right mix of personalities (profiles) with jobs assigned that match their profile. These profiles influence team performance and the dynamics within a team. But, when these profiles match, success becomes a natural and automatic outcome. Conflict results when these profiles are mismatched. A person with a stronger ego profile may be assigned a leadership role. Never put two egoistic people together. To build a great team, a team leader must harness the strength of each member of his/her team. Match these profiles for a more cohesive working. This is also how each member of a team can maximize his/her strengths. Dr KK Aggarwal National President IMA & HCFI